Vegan

How to order vegan at fast food resturants

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Image via Pintrest.

What do you eat? Is probably the question I’m asked the most as a vegan. And I have to try really hard not to roll my eyes. There is so much food—it’s glorious. But for new vegans—and people considering transitioning or reducing their consumption—knowing what is and isn’t okay can be difficult when you’re desperate for a feed in public. So, here you go:

McDonalds

There’s been a lot of controversy about this. I don’t know about how it is overseas, but in Australia, the chips and hash browns are vegan. You can also get burgers without meat and cheese—I am fond of a hamburger with no meat, and then putting some fries inside. There’s also the option to create your own burger—but keep in mind, some of the fillings will be cooked alongside meat. You can ask them to cook it separately, but whether or not they do it is another thing. Plus, Maccas are always super busy. Also, the salsa fries are vegan! Rejoice!

Dominos

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Vegan pizza, oh my god. Image via PETA.

The classic bases and tomato sauces are vegan. I order any of the vegetarian ones, and simply remove the cheese. There’s loads of veggies we can eat—like tomato, spinach, capsicum, pineapple, olives, and so on. Considering you could veganise a $5 value pizza for a meal, Dominos is pretty exciting.

Also, GARLIC BREAD. That is all.

 

Red Rooster

Again, GARLIC BREAD IS VEGAN! Holla! Also, they sell roast veggies. Admittedly, they’re often not great—but if you’re stuck with nothing else, it will sustain you. Of course, you could always order a burger without meat, cheese or mayo, and ask for salads instead. For the most part, workers are very understanding and helpful—but maybe don’t do this if they’re super busy, because they will absolutely hate you.

Hungry Jacks

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Introducing: the Veggie Whopper. Yummmm. Image via Vegan Outreach.

Did someone say Veggie Whopper with no cheese or mayo? YUM! At first, I was wary about a burger lacking mayonnaise, but trust me: it works. Also, sometimes I just bring my own mayonnaise or vegan cheese. Regardless, when you’re drunk or starving or need some kind of comfort food, this giant burger will totally hit the spot. And don’t forget the fries and onion rings! Mmmmmm onion rings.

Grill’d

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The Veggie Vitality! Image via PETA.

Exciting news! Grill’d have recently announced an entirely vegan burger to their menu—the Veggie Vitality!  It features a quinoa veggie patty, sweet potato, beetroot, pineapple, avocado, carrot and lettuce. It is quite tasty and very satisfying, but I’d highly recommend asking for tomato relish sauce as well, to give it a bit more of a zing! Otherwise, there are numerous tasty vegetarian options you can veganise (by removing products like cheese, mayonnaise and pesto). My personal favourite is the Garden Goodness burger, which (ordered without cheese) is amazing. Adding pineapple is always a bonus for me! All of Grill’d’s chips are also vegan—sweet potato chips! Zucchini chips! Potato chips! Yum. The tomato relish sauce is vegan and serves amazingly with these options. Watch out for the super low carb bun though—it has egg! All other buns are vegan, though. Give it a try!

Subway

A delicious Veggie Delight sub is sure to cure any hunger pains! You can order any white, brown or wholemeal bread and a range of amazing veggies, like carrot, lettuce, cucumber, tomato, avocado, pickles, olives, and so on. There is also a veggie patty available, but I prefer a simple salad sandwich. Vegan sauces include BBQ, tomato, sweet chilli and sweet onion—the latter is my personal favourite! Sadly, none of the smoothies or cookies are vegan. Oh well, at least Oreos are!

Guzman Y Gomez

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Burrito bowl with no cheese. So much love. Image via Canberra Vegan.

I actually cried tears of happiness to find out the guacamole here is vegan. I mean, YUM! You can basically order any of the “veggie” options without the cheese, and it will be vegan. There’s burritos, burrito bowls, guacamole and chips—not to mention frozen alcoholic beverages. Wink wink. Definitely somewhere you should check out!

Kebab shops

Two words: felafel kebabs. Vegan. Delicious. I particularly love adding pineapple or hummus to mine, with a sweet chilli or BBQ sauce—as well as a heap of veggies! Don’t be afraid to ask what vegan options they have! But keep in mind, sometimes places make their own hummus, and I have been caught a few times where the hummus has not been vegan (bad news for your stomach). Enjoy!

 

 

I’m sorry, but I don’t support the dairy industry.

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I feel for our dairy farmers—I really do.

I can’t imagine how it would feel to have everything you’ve ever known dwindle around you. To have your livelihoods rendered worthless. To be thrown into unfair debt. I have no doubt that dairy farmers have the best intentions—and maybe some of them really do look after their animals. But even so: dairy is a destructive industry, where animals are objectified as means to an economic end—and this isn’t okay.

Before you abuse me, take a moment to consider my words—humour me.

Let’s think about the practicality of dairy and how we actually get milk—cows don’t just magically produce it: it results from pregnancy. Like humans, cows carry their young for nine months.  Unlike humans, most cows will have their young taken away within 12-14 hours after birth due to their economic strain. Calves less than 30 days old—known as bobby cows—will often be sent to the slaughterhouse. In Australia, this is around 400,000 calves per year. This “cruel separation” is a traumatic experience, destined to be repeated over and over for a cow’s workable lifetime— every 13 months. These calves will never even taste their mother’s milk.

There are 1.6 million dairy cows in Australia. While cows will naturally live around 20 years, cows in the dairy industry are only expected to live around seven to eight years. Australian cows also produce around 5730L of milk per year—which is incredible, as the average is only 2900L.  Our farmers are struggling, and no matter how beloved certain cows may be, farmers simply need to get as much as they can from their livestock. But is money worth these drastic measures?

Speaking of drastic measures, let’s talk about industry standards. Yes, there are standards—and yes, they’re a lot better than a lot of other countries. They do genuinely try to provide better lives and treatment for cows in terms of welfare. But some aspects are still quite barbaric, such as dehorning and castration. Dehorning is a common practise for male and female cows, which involves sensitive tissue being sawn off. Castration, while considered a major operation for older bulls, can be done to males younger than six months by anyone—no matter how inexperienced. Shockingly, there are no laws required for pain relief.

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Bobby cows. Image via Vice.

Is cruelty and objectification not enough to convince you of a change of heart? Well, let’s look at health factors.

For decades, we’ve been fed the idea that dairy is best—that we need it. But consider who would have encouraged this propaganda: that’s right, the for-profit dairy industry. Yes, dairy is the source of calcium and other vitamins, but to put it bluntly: it’s not meant for us. It’s meant for a rapidly growing baby calf.

Dr Mark Hyman said consuming dairy is actually not in our best interests, and that we’ve been force-fed many ideas that are not factual. For instance, milk doesn’t reduce fractures—it may actually increase the risk of them by 50%. By consuming five to seven portions of fruits and veggies per day (and no animal products), a person can reduce their risk of heart disease by 47%, strokes by 26%, and cancer by up to 18%. Furthermore, about 75% of the population is lactose intolerant. Know why?

Because. We’re. Not. Meant. To. Drink. Another. Animal’s. Milk.

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Breaking this bond is the price of dairy. Image via My Mind Vegan.

Think about it. Think about what they’re not telling you. Do you think animals should be used purely for economic gain? Even if you don’t think it’s wrong for them to be killed for our consumption, I’d like to think that—as reasonable agents—we can agree that cows should at least be treated well—starting with stricter industry standards and better policing. Even if they’re going to be slaughtered, at the very least, they should live fulfilling lives.

Does this make you feel sad? Do you wish things were different? Well, they can be—and you can help. Change begins with education. Even one mind changed can start a revolution. As it is, we don’t need dairy—there are plenty of plant-based sources of calcium, like dark leafy greens, beans, pulses, nuts, brown bread, enriched fruit juice, plant-based milks, soy mince, tofu and so on. Dairy is dwindling—the number of farms in the last two decades has decreased by two thirds. Maybe there’s a reason for it.

Dairy farmers, I feel sorry for you—that you’ve been brought into this war and are struggling. That you’re only paid 37 cents for a litre of milk, despite it costing 38 cents to produce. But instead of supporting our farmers by buying their product, why don’t we encourage them and donate to them to create new and sustainable livelihoods—livelihoods that don’t rely on forced slavery.

Some things are meant to change—and I for one choose compassion.

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Cows smile when you don’t eat them or take away their babies. Image via Reddit.

Guide on cruelty-free transitioning

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So maybe you don’t want animals to die. Maybe you feel bad about the suffering some of them go through. Maybe you really wish you could live a life that’s as sustainable and caring as possible. But how? How can you even think about limiting or discontinuing your consumption of animal products? It’s such an ingrained part of society. It’s everywhere. We’re taught that it’s natural, that it’s normal, that we as human beings have superiority over non-human animals. That it’s our right to consume them. But is it our right to allow them to suffer? To be the cause of their suffering? No.

Do you think as I do? Does it sadden you when you see those horrific videos of pigs in cages too small to move? Where farmed animals may never see the sun or fell the grass under their feet, where their lives are taken advantage of purely for our purposes of consumption? If the answer is yes, you may want to consider at least limiting your impact—and here’s my little handy guide of how.

Milk:

This is probably one of the easiest things to change, because of the variety you have in what you choose to drink. There’s so many choices! You’ve got multiple types of soy milks, each creamier than the next, or almond milk, sweet rice milk, coconut milk, macadamia milk and hazelnut milk. Whether its cooking or coffee, these things work just as well. Personally, I think the cheap soy milk is great—and bonus, it contains lots of protein and nutrients to fill you up.

Cheese:

This is often the most difficult thing I hear people say. In fact, I used to be one of those people. Having been vegetarian for 7 years before becoming vegan about 10 months ago, I would always respond with yes, I’m vegetarian! But I could never go vegan. I love cheese. Dairy is my favourite food group. And it really was. But after researching what a lot of dairy cows go through—that they’re (often) artificially inseminated and kept pregnant their entire lives to produce dairy, with their babies taken away to become veal or future dairy cows—I decided no food could ever be worth their cries.

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Image via Just The Food.

Even so, replacing cheese was really difficult for me. Some vegans avoid substitutes all together, by using other ingredients—like avocado or tomato paste—for that “melty” effect. However, as a former dairy lover, I do enjoy cheese—but fear not! There is plenty of choice for cruelty-free dairy! Biocheese happens to be a favourite of mine, and for around $7-9, it’s certainly worth it. The texture is a little different to your usual cheese, but it’s super creamy and to die for when melted—even better than actual cheese, I’d argue. There’s also Tofutti cream cheese and sour cream, both of which are super creamy, tasty and useful in cooking. Any health food store will sell plenty of these kinds of things—and even Coles and Woolworths. Furthermore, I’ve recently discovered you can make your own cheese, using things like cashews, and nutritional yeast flakes, which have together create a creamy, cheesy flavour. Google is your best friend—explore, experiment and have some fun eating some tasty creations.

Meat:

Meat is probably the easiest thing to replace, give up or reduce. We really do not need it to survive—you can get all your nutrients and more from plants. But if you do long for meat, there are vegan alternatives. Firstly, you have things like grilled mushrooms, or other veggies—using the right flavouring, they can be quite similar. Tofu is also a great substitute when cooked well. A personal favourite of mine is to thinly slice tofu and coat with paprika, salt, pepper and garlic, before searing it and making a delicious dipping sauce to go with it—healthy and super easy for lazy people like me. There’s also plenty of fake meats. The frozen section of supermarkets normally have a great choice of burgers, sausages, pies, schnitzels, and so on. Textured soy protein is a new personal favourite of mine—it’s super cheap at around $3 for a big bag; just add water and heat. It can be used for the same kind of thing mince is used for.

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Image via Pura Botanica.

There’s also plenty of online shops where you can find all sorts of goodies! Lam Yong has a physical and online store, and they sell everything. I am crazy excited to try vegan prawns, soy duck and vegan drumsticks.

There’s really plenty of options. I’m not here to force you—I’m just expressing my experiences in attaining a healthy cruelty-free lifestyle. Going vegan has been the best thing I’ve ever done, and my life, as well as the lives of the animals who are slowly being saved by this movement, is better for it.

16 stupid things vegans everywhere are tired of hearing.

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I may look like i’m smiling, but if you make that vegan joke one more time, i’m going to stab you with this form. Image via iStock.

I’m vegan, and like many other vegans, I am asked incredibly stupid questions all the time. Last week, while at a friend’s wedding, a person came up to me and asked, “what do you even eat?” while  I was holding a massive plate of food.  So, to clear it up for you, here’s a list of questions, along with answers.

You’re vegan? Why?

I love animals. I don’t want them to die. I don’t want them to suffer. I don’t think they should be mistreated or killed for a human to have a snack. I also care about the environment.

The meat and dairy industry is not sustainable. According to the United Nations, one billion people do not have enough food. This is expected to rise to three billion within the next 50 years—and animal consumption is a leading cause of this. How? It takes around 9034L of water to produce 0.5kg of meat, compared to 923L for the same amount of tofu. To produce 3.8L of milk, 2585L of water is needed. Furthermore, it takes 4kg of grain to produce 0.5kg of meat. This is because these animals are raised purely to be slaughtered—if the demand did not exist, neither would the strain on resources. These resources could then be used elsewhere and actually solve world hunger.

By converting to a vegan diet, you can save around 829,000L of water per year. Simply decreasing the amount of meat and dairy you consume is incredibly beneficial to the environment and your body. Please, be mindful.

What, do you think you’re better than me or something?

No. Vegans don’t think we’re better than any human or animal. Hence why we don’t eat either.

 

But if the animal is already dead, you may as well eat it, right?

Face palm.

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If you think it’s wrong, that’s because it is. If you feel guilty or defensive, ask yourself: why?

Where do you get your protein?

You do realise there’s protein in more than just meat, dairy and eggs, right? Like, in vegetables? Same thing with iron. Shitloads of veggies is more than enough to be incredibly healthy. There’s also tofu (but not all vegans like tofu!) and other meat and dairy alternatives.

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I bet you’re iron deficient.

My iron levels are fine, thank you very much.

 

But bacon.

Pigs are cute! Why would you want to murder them? They are living things. They think. They feel pain. They have emotions. They have the will to love. Why should they lose their life so you can have a snack?

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Bacon.

Apparently, humans taste like bacon too. Are you going to eat them?

What do you even eat then?

Air. I eat air. And sunlight.  Because it’s not like 75% of the average omnivore eats fruits, veggies and grains in their diets anyway.

FYI, the answer is shitloads of vegetables, fruits, pastas, breads, wraps, lasagnes, soups, curries, desserts, chocolates, ice creams cookies . . . Sound familiar? We miss out on nothing. There’s delicious, cruelty-free and healthy alternatives to everything. OREOS ARE ALSO VEGAN!

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You’re just one person, you can’t change the world.

Are you serious? How do you think any kind of change happens? We recognise that something is wrong. We change it. We explain it to other people, and they agree. As more and more people come to realise the environmental and health impacts, if they’re reasonable people, they will change—or at least be mindful and decrease the amount of meat and dairy they consume.

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We’re supposed to eat meat.

No. We’re not. And it’s destroying the environment. And a whole heap of other health problems.

But plants are living things too, why do you eat them?

Do you tie your own shoe laces in the morning?

Vegans are always trying to shove their beliefs down my throat!

Yeah, because your beliefs are destroying the environment.

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My food poops on your food.

You’d eat it too, then, moron. And no, no they don’t.

Do you guys ever shut up about veganism?

No.

How do you know if someone is a vegan? Don’t worry, they’ll tell you.

Damn straight, i’ll friggin’ tell you. I’ll tell you until the cows come home. Oh, wait. You ate them. Also, that’s a stupid joke.

Vegans are weak!

Arnold Schwarzenegger is (sometimes) vegan. He also advocates for meatless diets. This guy is also vegan:

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Want to tell me again vegans are weak? Billy Simmonds is a vegan competition-winning body builder and martial arts instructor. Image via Unleashed.

Did you have to Google how to spell that last name?

Yes.

Check out other celebrities who have ditched meat and dairy:

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Ariana Grande.
Ellen and Portia vegan ABC
Ellen Degeneres and Portia de Rossi
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Ellen Page.
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Ellie Goulding.
jared leto
Jared Leto.
Natalie Portman image via deadline
Natalie Portman.
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Peter Dinklage.
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Ricky Martin.
Russel brand vegan
Russel Brand.
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Samuel L Jackson.

Vegan lasagna recipe

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Note: this image isn’t actually my cooking. I always eat my cooking before taking photos. That’s how delicious it is. Mmmmmmmm…

I was vegetarian for seven years before becoming a vegan about six months ago—and I’ve never felt better. But after seven years of perfecting an amazing vegetarian lasagna recipe, I pretty much have to start all over again as a vegan! And there’s a couple of ways to do it—this is just my personal favourite. And it’s loaded with veggie goodness! Warning: reading this will probably make you really, really hungry!

Ingredients:

Use whatever veggies you have in the fridge. But in case you want some guidance, this is what I normally use:

  • Zucchini
  • Onion
  • Carrot
  • Broccoli
  • Mushroom
  • Capsicum
  • Spinach
  • Sweet potato
  • Tomato
  • Vegan butter (I use Nuttlex).
  • Wraps (I use Mountain Bread so it’s not as heavy as pasta sheets—use whatever you like, though!)
  • Garlic
  • Soy milk—or some other kind of non-dairy milk
  • Flour
  • Tomato pasta sauce (or you can make your own—just blend tomatoes and herbs together. Delicious.)
  • Vegan cream cheese (I use Tofutti).
  • Optional: vegan mince.

Method:

  • Chop up/grate all your veggies; you choose what you do to what. For the sweet potato, you’ll want to chop them into the smallest pieces you possibly can. I cook these before the lasagna so it doesn’t take as long. Simply put the chopped sweet potato into a microwave-safe container for steaming, fill with a little hot/boiling water, and cook for about 10 minutes or until soft. Do this first, and then chop the rest of your veggies.
  • Use a medium-to-large sized pot (depending on how much you’re making!) and begin by sautéing the onions with some garlic, pepper, and whatever herbs you feel like adding (BASIL IS AMAZING, JUST SAYING). You can also add mushrooms and zucchini here if you wish.
  • Add your vegan mince (if you’re using it), and most of your other veggies (except for the sweet potato) into the pot. I like to leave some carrot and tomato slices for the creamy layers of the lasagne, but do whatever you like. Add the tomato pasta sauce and adjust to taste.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 220 degrees.
  • Make your creamy sauce: add butter, and slowly stir in the flour to make a nice consistency. Remember: this will thicken as time goes on. Add some garlic, Tofutti, and a little bit of soy milk if you don’t want to use butter. You could also use nutritional yeast flakes here. Alter to taste, and make sure to stir: this mixture burns easily. Take it off the heat when done.
  • The sweet potato should now be cooked. I like to mash it up with a fork, some vegan butter, Tofutti, garlic, salt and pepper at this point to make mashed sweet potato.
  • Spray a large oven-safe dish with canola oil (or something similar). Line the base with your first layer of Mountain Bread (or whatever you’re using. Note: I’ve never cooked with pasta sheets before, so if you’re using those, read the instructions).
  • Spoon tomato mix onto this first layer, enough to nicely cover the wrap.
  • Add another layer of wraps on top of the mince mixture. Then spread your sweet potato mix on this layer, before adding about half of the creamy sauce.
  • Repeat steps 8 and 9 until all mixture has been used. The final layer will be the creamy sauce. Feel free to add some vegan cheese or basil here—depending on what you’ve got, and what you like.
  • Place lasagna in the oven and cook until the top layer is crispy. Since we’re vegan (yay) we don’t have to worry about under-cooking meat, and since I’ve used wraps, you don’t have to worry about the pasta sheets being under cooked.

And there you have it, folks! Delicious vegan lasagne. If anyone has any tips, feel free to leave them in the comments!

Love, the poor and lazy uni student vegan.

THE BEST vegan chocolate ball recipe ever!

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My partner and I tried this recipe out of an experimentation that turned into—seriously—the BEST vegan chocolate thing I’ve ever eaten. And it wasn’t even that difficult! If I can do it, I figure anyone can do it—assuming you have some kind of blender available (we use one of those Magic Bullets or whatever).

So, all you chocolate lovers rejoice! Here’s a delicious and simple recipe you’ll love!

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Ingredients:

  • Dates
  • Orange juice
  • Peanut butter (a few table spoons)
  • Coco powder (or some form of chocolate powder that’s vegan.)
  • Fried noodles (or some kind of dried noodles—just to add some crunch! It’s delicious, trust me.)
  • Dark chocolate
  • Skewers (can be used without, though)
  • A blender

Note: use as much of these ingredients as you wish. The dates are the basis for the recipe, so that will essentially be the amount of mixture you end up with. I’d recommend using more peanut butter than you’d think.

Method:

  • First, you’ll want to soak your dates in some orange juice. This will soften them and add some sweetness. If you want to soak them overnight, that’s great—but I’m impatient, so I let them soak for a few minutes before microwaving them (but not for too long!). You want them to be soft enough to blend.
  • Combine the soft dates (drain the orange juice—though you can use a little of this for a bit of extra moisture if you wish) with the peanut butter, coco powder, and blend.
  • Put mixture into a bowl, and add the fried dry noodle bits, which should be broken apart. Mix.
  • If the consistency is right, you should be able to roll the mixture into small, bite-sized balls using your hands. Place these on a tray (use foil or baking paper if you’re lazy like me and don’t want to wash it up later).
  • Melt some dark chocolate—enough to cover the pieces. You can do this on the stove at a low heat (make sure to stir thoroughly so you don’t burn it) or the microwave.
  • Use the skewers (or whatever you think) to pick up the chocolate pieces, and dip them into the dark chocolate. Cover as much as you can. If you have left-over chocolate, simply use a spoon to pour on top of the chocolate balls.
  • Place tray in fridge—serve when the chocolate has set.

This process actually doesn’t take too long, and my god: they’re delicious, and very worth it! And there you have it folks—enjoy!

DELICIOUS vegan egg salad mix

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Are you drooling yet? Image via PETA.

Time: 5-10 minutes.

I don’t know about other vegans, but something I find myself often craving is an egg salad sandwich. Obviously, being vegan, I’m not about to break my morals to eat one; so I’ve been on the hunt for a great recipe that doesn’t involve animal abuse.

There’s lots of recipes on the internet; this is just my particular one I’ve found (and god, it’s DELICIOUS!). I’m giving you the poor uni student version of vegan cooking—also, the lazy version. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

  • Tofu (I don’t think it matters what kind).
  • Nutritional yeast flakes (you can find these at your local health food store; filled with all kinds of good things vegans need! The bag is around $10, but it lasts a fair while and can be used in so many other things).
  • (Some recipes call for some kind of sulfuric egg-tasting salt, but I’m too poor for that; normal salt works fine.)
  • Vegan mayonnaise. (A lot of the 99% fat free mayonnaise are actually vegan! Yay! I use Praise.)
  • Vegan butter. I use Nuttlex which can be found in most supermarkets. If not, some kind of oil would also work. A teaspoon should be enough.
  • Instant mash potato (or actual mashed potato, it doesn’t really matter.)

Method:

I don’t really measure anything—I go by consistency and flavour. You be the judge! About a teaspoon of most ingredients, but a fair bit of mayonnaise (depending what you like) and a larger amount of tofu.

  • Crumble up your desired amount of tofu into an average-sized bowl (depending on how much you’re making!).
  • If you’re using leftover mashed potato, combine this with the tofu. If you’re using instant, you’d probably want to do that first, mixing the powder with hot water (but not too much, as we have other liquids to go in!).
  • Heat your vegan butter in the microwave for 10-20 seconds, depending on your microwave; just enough to melt. If you’re using oil (which may change the flavour), you can skip this step.
  • Combine potato, tofu, butter and all the other ingredients in the bowl; mix. From here on, it’s about adjusting: add more of the flavours and things you like more. I personally like to add a fair bit of nutritional yeast flakes, mayo and the turmeric; I just prefer the flavour. See what you like!

Optional: If you want to make curried eggs, add a bit of curry powder!

Serve this deliciousness however you like! Enjoy!

 

Do the choices you make support animal abuse?

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Six million animals will be tested on each year in Australia and New Zealand alone. In many cases, these animals are subject to a degree of pain and/or stress. Of these 6 million, nearly 26,000 will die, and a further 124,000 will experience major trauma—this includes being artificially induced with cancer, made to experience major infections, isolation as well as deprivation. More than a million will also experience a degree of stress and discomfort.

And the animals used would surprise you—of course, over a million of these are mice, but a whopping 765,000 are native mammals, including koalas, wallabies, possums and wombats. Cats and dogs are also commonly used.

But the problem is that most of us don’t even know we’re supporting animal cruelty. By purchasing and using these products, we are unknowingly supporting a culture that believes animal lives are less important than human lives—it’s supporting a culture that claims to love animals, yet has no problem with subjecting them to harm and abuse.

We know this is so utterly wrong—so what can we do about it?

As with any kind of advocacy, education is key. Educate yourselves on the products you’re using—and what products test on animals. Cleaning products that test on animals include Ajax, Glen 20, Finish, Windex, Raid, Duck, Dettol, Oral B, Gillette and impulse.  Cosmetic offenders include Max Factor, Maybeline, MAC, L’Oreal, Estee Lauder, Cover Girl, Clinique, Mary Kay, Avon, Clearasil, Napoleon and Elizabeth Arden.

Most of these things live either under my sink or in my make-up bag. But since becoming aware of the issue, I’ve sought out cruelty-free alternatives that are AWESOME. The Choose Cruelty Free app is a great place to start, as is good old Google. Fear not about compromising on quality; I’ve made myself a Guinea pig so you don’t have to.

Here are my top cruelty-free cosmetics you should DEFINITELY try:

Lush:

Lush are an Australian company which makes hand-made cosmetics and body care products—and they are ABSOLUTELY AMAZING! I’m currently using their skin care products, soaps, bath bombs and some cosmetics. Everything leaves me feeling clean, relaxed, soft and fragrant. Their facial cleanser, spot treatment and moisturiser has done amazing things for my oily, acne-prone skin; and I especially love their bottled lip colours. Surprisingly, they do have a fair bit of staying power—though beware: they tend to smudge easy!

Kat Von D:

I cannot rave about these products enough! Her studded kiss lipsticks and everlasting liquid lipsticks last all day, with oodles of awesome colours–including one rather lovely light purple. The foundation is absolutely mind-blowing. It will stay on all day, and it won’t leave those awful marks on your face when you wear sunglasses with your make up! The eye shadow colours are phenomenal, and the liquid eye liner pens come in all sorts of colours, and are delicate enough to make wings sharp enough to cut the haters.  Most of her products are vegan, too! Kat Von D products make up most of my makeup bag. You can buy them online or instore at Sephora.

Australis:

One of the cheaper brands out there, Australis may pleasantly surprise you. In fact, I think their eye shadows and pressed powders are on par with products you may end up spending hundreds on. If you can find it, try it—products are normally around $10: fantastic value for money.

Nude by Nature:

I’ve used their CC cream and liquid foundation—both of which are available in a variety of shades, and are quite nice and light on your skin (sometimes the liquid foundation can flake if it’s caked on—but lasts super well in our hot Australian weather). My favourite product is a liquid illuminator, which somehow seems to perfect your face and minimise your pores. I’ve also heard good things about their mineral powder. These products are roughly around $20-40, but I think it’s worth it.

Arbornne:

I love these products. While they are a bit pricey, I think quality is worth it. Their primer is brilliant! And it’s great they have so many different foundation colours—score for us super pale ladies! I am eager to try more of their products, though—as a poor uni student—I definitely can’t afford to any time soon. Sigh—the woes of cosmetics!

Young Blood:

These products are the most expensive on the list, but they are quite lovely. Personally, I’m not the biggest fan of mineral cosmetics. I’d prefer products with a bit more coverage—but if minerals are your thing, give them a try.

Natio:

Natio’s eyeshadows are pretty great—though I wish they had a bigger range! I have tried their mineral foundation and primer, but wasn’t too pleased: there wasn’t enough coverage for me. On the plus side, Natio are pretty cheap, and have colours for us pale ladies! And aside from lip products, Natio is vegan!

Other products I’ve heard good things about are Ere Perez and Inika—but I’m yet to try them.

You make the choice dear readers. Because whether you like it or not, if you purchase products which test on animals, you’re promoting animal abuse, and prolonging the outdated idea that animals are ours to do with as we wish. Don’t be silent! Sign the RSPCA campaign against animal testing here.

Have you tried any great vegan/cruelty-free products? Let me know in the comments

6 tips to inspire yourself to hit the gym

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Going to the gym is hard.

I find I often start off with the best of intentions, only to find myself falling into a pile of procrastination and excuses. If it’s in the morning, I groan as I put my alarm clock to snooze for the seventh time (I am not kidding, I need this to even consider waking up in the morning). Then I think to myself, I work hard at uni. I have such long days. I deserve a sleep in, yay me. Night time is quite similar—I think, well, it will probably be crowded now it’s after 5pm. Honestly, I just want to go home and make some kind of delicious elaborate food. Maybe I’ll study. Maybe I’ll even have a bubble bath. Do I do any of these things? Absolutely not. My routine normally consists of lazy (yet still somewhat healthy) vegan meals and a lot of time procrastinating either gaming, watching movies, or binge-watching TV shows and anime.

So, how do you make yourself change? I asked personal trainer Melanie Hawksley for her best tips—along with some probably embarrassing anecdotes on my part.

  • Find your motivation

What do you want out of exercise and healthy eating? Is it for the right reasons? As women, we’re so often bombarded with a relentless stream of people telling us how we should and shouldn’t look. Maybe, sometimes we just want to feel sexy and confident. I’ll admit, I often feel the need to work out because I am unhappy with my body. However, this can become a bit obsessive. Instead, I like to repeat Jennifer Lawerence’s ideas of body image.  When training for her role as Katniss in the Hunger Games, she famously argued:

“I’m never going to starve myself for a part . . . I don’t want little girls to be like, ‘Oh, I want to look like Katniss, so I’m going to skip dinner . . . I was trying to get my body to look fit and strong, not thin and underfed.”

Instead of thinking of working out as a way to get sexy, think of it as a way to nourish and strengthen your body. After all, it will carry you for life.

  • Find like-minded people

Specifically, people who will keep you motivated. People who have similar goals.

“You need to find someone (or a group of people) who will push you to the gym, and you to them, even when you may not feel interested,” Melanie Hawksley said.

This is difficult for me. I’ve recently moved to a new area, so I know pretty much no one. I briefly considered posting in random Facebook pages (but they could possibly turn out to be total psycopaths). My solution: I started a Facebook chat group with my friends who have similar goals. We motivate each other (mostly) and try to keep ourselves accountable. We even have friendly competitions to spur each other on—like who can run the most in 20 minutes, or improve the most in a week. Any and all achievements are celebrated.

  • Set specific goals

“If your goals are not important enough, then it is likely you won’t follow them through.”

Are you training for a certain marathon? Is there an occasion you’re working towards? A holiday where you want to feel confident and sexy in formalwear and swimwear?

For me, I want to be happy with my body. I want it to be strong. After all, it will support me in all of life’s ups and downs. And honestly, I really like eating food.

“So many people do [it] just to look better but it is often not a powerful enough reason to keep you going back month after month. There needs to be a very powerful driver to keep up the motivation as you go,” Mel added.

This is why a more wholesome approach to health is far better—if your goals are to be healthy and nourish your body, you’re more likely to stick to it than if it was just to look like a Victoria’s Secret model.

  • Keep a diary

I don’t mean some kind of obsessive calorie-counting record. Buy a cute diary, fill it with motivational quotes and pictures (Jennifer Lawerence for me), as well as your goals and progress. I also wrote a note to myself: never give up.  Any time I felt like giving up, I’d read this and usually get a sense of motivation enough for me to change into gym clothes.

  • Find a form of fitness you love

Try joining a local sporting team, take a yoga class, go for a walk on the beach, try pole dancing, or even random every day exercises at the home or gym. Find something you genuinely enjoy, and it won’t feel like a burden to you.

Personally, I’d love to either learn pole dancing or self-defence. But then I remember I’m poor, and stick to my cheap gym membership.

  • Don’t feel like you have to conform to societal standards of beauty

All my life, I have struggled intensively with my own body image. I remember sitting in Kindergarten, and having a fellow classmate whisper to me: “you know you’re fat, right?” to which my five-year-old self nodded. Since then, I’ve struggled with eating disorders and fad diets. Honestly? They’re not worth it. Seriously. Don’t waste your money on Isagenix or any other tea tox. Yeah, you might lose weight, but that is because you are not eating. It’s not healthy, and it’s not sustainable. But time and time again, I try these things because I felt I needed to be skinny to feel happy. Wrong.

My dear reader, if you ever feel like this, I encourage you to metaphorically (or literally) yell: “fuck that!”. Because you are beautiful. Because you are powerful. Because you are strong. Because you’ve overcome every single challenge you’ve come across. Because you know true beauty is in the person you are, and how you treat those around you. Make a change for the right reasons, not the wrong ones.

And most importantly?

Love yourself. Know that what you look like does not decide your worth as a human being. Screw society’s beauty standards.

It’s a Vegetarian Wonderland! An Au Lac Review

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It’s hard to be a vegetarian sometimes—especially in a society dominated by the meat industry. I would certainly be very rich if I had a dollar for every time I’ve gone to a restaurant only to find no vegetarian options, other than a bowl of chips or boring garden salad. Fellow vegetarians, we know this feeling well. But fret no more: we have Au Lac’s Royal Vegetarian Cuisine!

I cannot express how amazing it is for a vegetarian to find a restaurant where you don’t have to worry about being stuck with a boring meal. A restaurant where you don’t have to worry that the cooks will accidently slip in some form of animal product. Where you know they didn’t cook your vegetarian meals with the same pans as they cooked meat in. A place where you feel at home—only with tastier food, fantastic and fast service, as well as a stunning, elegant atmosphere, complete with forest-inspired wall art and crystal chandeliers.

I stumbled across this place a few weeks ago, and was instantly greeted like an old friend. Despite the fact that I accidently entered the store half an hour before opening, the workers insisted it was okay—they were happy to serve me, despite not yet being open. All this was delivered with a smile. Of course, I declined and insisted I would come back when they were open—and I did. Even when I paid for my meal with dollar coins and asked for a tax invoice, they smiled (I’m an annoying customer, I know).

Au Lac is 100% vegetarian, with vegan and gluten and nut free options available upon request, and are dedicated to bringing customers the finest, healthiest meals from only the freshest producers. Because I know you’re probably wondering, the meat-free alternatives are made from a variety of products, including soy protein, wheat flour, mushrooms, and an extremely healthy Asian plant called konnyaku. Quality and health has been a part of Au Lac’s philosophy since it first opened in 2000 with two store locations: one in Dickson, Canberra, and the other right here in Wollongong—2/166 Kiera Street. Opening hours are Monday to Sunday, from a convenient and handy 11.30am to 2.30pm, and 5.30pm to 10.30pm.

So let’s get to the important stuff: the food. Honey soy chicken. Soy chicken nuggets. Soy chicken satay sticks. Satay soy beef. Soy chicken in plum sauce. Fried soy fish in a savoury ginger sauce. Fried soy squid with spicy salt and chilli. Braised tofu with vegetables and cashew nuts.  And let’s not forget dessert: banana cake, sundaes and deep fried ice cream. Okay, my mouth is now watering. But best of all about Au Lac? They’re affordable—affordable enough for even a poor university student, with prices ranging from $5-$18. The average main meal is around $15.90, with boiled rice a shockingly cheap $2.50 per person.

It’s the little things that really make a place special, and Au Lac is one of those places. Trip Adviser Australia rates Au Lac a 4.5 out of 5 stars—and I’m going to do the same. On a side note, I’m now starving and desperate for some vegetarian goodness. Try it—and thank me later!